Thursday, August 6, 2015

How the criminal elite live - The UK's Royal family

Apart from the latest 'scandal', that of a young Elizabeth of German ancestry Haus Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha, shown giving the NAZI salute, many people may not know or even (deliberately) forget the history of the war-mongering 'Royal' family.

Many people may forget:

  • that Captain Cook was sent to Australia on an 'economic' mission, where enslaving the Indigenous population, committing genocide and installing Martial Law upon the continent of Australia was all part of the plan,

  • how this family supported the use of Australians as 'canon fodder' in Gallipoli,

  • that queen that is part of the fraud that being of the "Queen of Australia".

She married her second cousin, through a tangled weB of incest, where her and her husband share the same great great grandmother Queen Victoria.

This family should not be admired, but rather stand trail for war crimes.

A family that will continue to thrive amongst the plebs that admire them.

The plebs really do deserve the enslavement that is bestowed on them?

Who's laughing at the commoners now, hey?


From the news.com.au article, of the headline:

Buckingham Palace gives rare glimpse behind the scenes at Summer Opening

Family home: Buckingham Palace is rarely open to the public. Picture: Chris Jackson/Getty
Family home: Buckingham Palace is rarely open to the public. Picture: Chris Jackson/Getty Images Source: Supplied
 
SITTING down to dinner at Buckingham Palace is much like a military operation. 

Each diner is given 47 centimetres of space, measured to the millimetre on tables that take three days to set. Nine pieces of cutlery are chosen from a collection of over 2000 pieces for four courses (fish, meat, pudding and fruit, plus a butter knife).

Six glasses are assigned per person (champagne, red, white, dessert wine, water and port). Each diner has a light to illuminate their food, prepared by a team of 21 chefs. Wine comes from the 400-year-old cellars where more than 25,000 bottles are stored.

Cutlery, glassware and china comes from a separate department, each headed with dedicated staff. Don’t even ask about the washing up — let’s just say they’re not using Finish powerball.

Last year the Queen received around 62,000 guests who got the full royal treatment. Photo
Last year the Queen received around 62,000 guests who got the full royal treatment. Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images. Source: Getty Images
 
Such rare insights are among those viewers to Buckingham Palace’s Summer Opening get to see at A Royal Welcome, a new exhibition that shows the work that goes into visiting the Queen.

It includes a glimpse of the Australian Coach — gifted by the people of Australia in 1988 to mark the bicentenary. It’s what the Queen uses to receive state visitors and is a modernised version of a traditional coach, made from metal rather than wood with electric windows and heating inside.

Visitors can enter via the same entrance the 110 heads of state that have visited the Queen have done, taking in the incredible reception halls of the palace that has been the royal family’s residence since 1837 and is one of the few working palaces in the world.

Master of the Household Vice Admiral Tony Johnstone Burt leads a team of 330 people who run operations behind the scenes — including two of the Queen’s most senior ladies in waiting who have been doing the job for 56 years.

“There is only one standard and that is exceptional,” he said.

The Bow room overlooks the expansive lawn where the Queen hosts a garden party each year.
The Bow room overlooks the expansive lawn where the Queen hosts a garden party each year. Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images. Source: Getty Images
 
Buckingham Palace is one of the few working palaces in the world. Photo by Anthony Devlin
Buckingham Palace is one of the few working palaces in the world. Photo by Anthony Devlin — WPA Pool/Getty Images. Source: Getty Images
 
Place settings are actually measured with a ruler. Picture: Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Get
Place settings are actually measured with a ruler. Picture: Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images. Source: Getty Images
 
The rooms open to the public include the Grand Staircase and Green Drawing Room, as well as a Gallery and Silk Tapestry Room housing famous royal collections of art and marble statues. Each is more elaborate than the last with gold plated furniture, hand cut glass chandeliers and rare objects that are among the few of their kind in the world.

The large bow room, where the Queen gave Angelina Jolie her honorary Damehood overlooks the 39 acre garden in the heart of London — a rare remnant from the original country house on the site.

Queen Elizabeth II’s outfits and jewellery are also on display, including a tiara made of 488 diamonds and a necklace with a 22.5 carat diamond pendant. It also contains the throne where she was crowned Queen more than 60 years ago.

Royal Collection Trust’s Anna Reynolds said the exhibition is designed to show what goes into the “extremely special” experience of visiting the royal family.

“Through the displays and film presentations, we show the planning, preparation and presentation that make these occasions so magnificent and so memorable.”

A Royal Welcome is open from 25 July to 27 September 2015

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