Monday, December 2, 2013

A former Amazon employee has revealed what it's really like to work for the internet retailer

FILE - In this 2010 photo, Leacroft Green places a package to the correct shipping area at an Amazon.com fulfilment centre, in Goodyear, Ariz. Source: AP
 
A former AMAZON employee has spoken out about the shocking work conditions in the online retailer's UK warehouses. 

23-year-old Adam Littler told a BBC1 documentary that he was expected to collect a different customer order every 33 seconds during his 10.5 hour night shifts.

He said he was 'worked to the bone' during his seven week stint with the company and could regularly walk more than 16km as he rushed to find orders in the 800,000 square foot distribution centre in Swansea.

"I've never done a job like this before," Littler told the documentary team.

"The pressure's unbelievable."

Amazon warehouse staff are reportedly armed with handheld scanners which tells them the quickest route to collect their next item and also counts down how long it should take them to get there.


Employees of internet retail giant Amazon stage a strike in front of the company's logistics centre in Germany, on November 2...
Employees of internet retail giant Amazon stage a strike in front of the company's logistics centre in Germany, on November 25, 2013 over pay conditions. Source: AFP
 
According to the Daily Mail, the warehouse workers have previously revealed they've been tracked with GPS devices during their shifts, with one employee from the Rugeley warehouse comparing working conditions to a 'slave camp.'

But an Amazon spokesman has denied the American company places unreasonable expectations on its employees.

"The safety of our associates is our number one priority and we adhere to all regulations and employment law," the spokesman said.

"Independent legal and health and safety experts review our processes as a further method of ensuring compliance."

news.com.au 26 Nov 2013

The whole purpose of 'globalisation' is to spread 'slavery' on a global scale for the financial benefit of the corporations.

Global corporations are allowed to exist in financial 'tax havens', only for the population to mop up their tax bills.

Amazon is not the only company that has slave labour conditions for its slaves (nee employees).

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